Psychiatry

Back to articles

Increased Diabetes Risk in Patients Taking Atypical Antipsychotic Agents

KEY POINT

In addition to weight gain and metabolic disruptions, atypical antipsychotic agents appear to increase patients’ risk of developing type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Results from two recent studies confirm findings from previous small studies: Nondiabetic patients with schizophrenia treated with atypical antipsychotics are at increased risk of problems with hyperglycemia, decreased insulin sensitivity, and diabetes, all of which can increase long-term cardiovascular risks.

SOURCES

Sernyak MJ et al. Association of diabetes mellitus with use of atypical neuroleptics in the treatment of schizophrenia. Am J Psychiatry. 2002;159:561–6.

Newcomer JD et al. Abnormalities in glucose regulation during antipsychotic treatment of schizophrenia. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2002;59:337–45.

Gothelf D et al. Weight gain associated with increased food intake and low habitual activity levels in male adolescent schizophrenic inpatients treated with olanzapine. Am J Psychiatry. 2002;159:1055–7.